top of page
  • Writer's picturedrnicolend

What Are The Signs & Symptoms of Hashimoto's?


Hypothyroid cold intolerance
Signs & symptoms of Hashimoto's Disease

Hashimoto's disease, also known as chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis, is an autoimmune condition that affects the thyroid gland. Let's shed light on the common signs and symptoms of Hashimoto's so you can recognize the early warning signs and start treatment right away. These symptoms usually begin as very general symptoms and gradually worsen over time.

  1. Fatigue and Lethargy: One of the hallmark symptoms of Hashimoto's is unexplained fatigue and constant lethargy. You may find it challenging to get through daily activities, even after a good night's sleep.

  2. Unexplained Weight Gain: Unintentional weight gain, despite maintaining a healthy diet and regular exercise routine, can be a sign of an underactive thyroid caused by Hashimoto's. The slowed metabolism may lead to weight fluctuations and make it difficult to shed pounds.

  3. Chronic Constipation: This is another early sign that often gets ignored. Thyroid hormones are needed to help move your intestines and move poop out of your body. A lack of thyroid hormones stall this process. Constipation is considered passing hard, dry stool or bowel movement less than 3 times per week. I would consider constipation not having at least one well-formed bowel movement once a day.

  4. Persistent Hair Loss: Experiencing excessive hair loss or thinning, particularly from your scalp, eyebrows, and even body hair, could be a red flag for Hashimoto's disease. The thyroid hormones play a vital role in hair growth and maintaining healthy hair follicles.

  5. Cold Sensitivity: Feeling unusually cold, even in warm environments, is a common symptom of an underactive thyroid. Hashimoto's can disrupt the body's ability to regulate temperature, making you more sensitive to cold temperatures.

  6. Muscle and Joint Pain: Hashimoto's can cause generalized muscle and joint pain, making daily movements uncomfortable and challenging. This pain may be mistaken for signs of aging or other health conditions.

  7. Mood Changes and Depression: Thyroid hormones play a significant role in regulating mood and emotional well-being. Hashimoto's can lead to mood swings, irritability, and even depression due to hormonal imbalances.

  8. Dry, Itchy Skin, Acne and Brittle Nails: Dry, rough, and itchy skin, hives, acne, as well as brittle nails, can be attributed to an underactive thyroid caused by Hashimoto's. Thyroid hormones play a crucial role in maintaining skin hydration and overall skin health.

  9. Menstrual Irregularities: For women, Hashimoto's can cause menstrual irregularities, such as heavier or irregular periods. Hormonal imbalances can affect the menstrual cycle and fertility.

  10. Brain Fog or Cognitive Issues: Hashimoto's can affect and inflame your brain by causing something called neuroinflammation which can affect your mental endurance, concentration, memory, and focus.

  11. Puffy Face, Puffy Eyes, Puffy Tongue: These may be especially noticeable when you first wake up in the morning.

  12. Swelling in the Neck (Goiter): In some cases, Hashimoto's can lead to the enlargement of the thyroid gland, resulting in a noticeable swelling in the neck known as a goiter.

Recognizing the signs and symptoms of Hashimoto's disease is the first step towards seeking proper diagnosis and treatment. If you or a loved one experience any of these symptoms persistently, it's crucial to consult a healthcare professional for a thorough evaluation.


Early detection and intervention can make a significant difference in managing Hashimoto's and improving overall well-being. Remember, you don't have to face this journey alone—if you are ready to start healing your Hashimoto's click here.




Disclaimer: The information provided in this blog is for educational purposes only and not a substitute for professional medical advice. Always consult with your healthcare provider for personalized guidance on managing Hashimoto's disease.



15 views0 comments
bottom of page